Sunil Garg

Research

I was a graduate student at Georgia Tech, where I worked in the Technology and International Development Lab and was advised by Michael Best. My research interests lie at the intersection of human-computer interaction (HCI) and technology for developing regions (ICTD).

As an undergraduate student at the University of Washington, I was an active member of the Change group and worked on MultiLearn under the direction of Richard Anderson and Joyojeet Pal.

Some examples of my work are below. Feel free to email me if you’d like to get in touch.

Conference Papers

  • Sharing in Public: Working With Others in Ghanaian Cybercaf├ęs
    Michael L. Best, Bence Kollanyi, Sunil Garg
    in ICTD 2012. (acceptance rate: 40.4%)

  • Evaluating an Adaptive Multi-User Educational Tool for Low-Resource Environments [paper]
    Emma Brunskill, Sunil Garg, Clint Tseng, Joyojeet Pal, Leah Findlater
    in ICTD 2010. (acceptance rate: 14.1%)

  • Examining Emergent Dominance Patterns in Multiple Input Based Educational Systems [paper]
    Clint Tseng, Sunil Garg, Heather Underwood, Leah Findlater, Richard Anderson, Joyojeet Pal
    in IDID 2010.

Research Reports

Workshops

  • MultiMath: Using Numeric Keypads to Utilize Limited Computer Resources for Education [paper]
    Heather Underwood, Clint Tseng, Charlotte Robinson, Sunil Garg, Meera Lakshmanan, Richard Anderson, Joyojeet Pal
    in DTMY at IDC 2009.

Posters

  • Exploring Collaborative Learning Methods for Multiplayer Educational Games in Low Resource Environments [paper]
    Heather Underwood, Sunil Garg, Clint Tseng, Leah Findlater, Richard Anderson, Joyojeet Pal
    in CSCW 2010.

Demos

  • BusyBoard: Sharing Online with the People Around You
    Sunil Garg, Deana Brown, Michael L. Best
    in ICTD 2012.

  • MultiMath: Numeric Keypads for Math Learning on Shared Personal Computers [paper]
    Sunil Garg, Charlotte Robinson, Clint Tseng, Heather Underwood, Richard Anderson, Joyojeet Pal
    in ICTD 2009. (acceptance rate: 39.0%)

Press

  • “One Keypad per Child” Lets School Children Share Screen to Learn Math [article]
    Computing Community Consortium, January 2010.

  • ‘One keypad per child’ lets schoolchildren share screen to learn math [article]
    by Hannah Hickey. University Week, December 2009.

  • The Top 25 Innovators & Entrepreneurs [article]
    by Talia Schmidt. Seattle Business Magazine, November 2009.

Service